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Taekwondo Bible, Vol.2  
5. Saram(Man)

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5-1. Saram of Samjae

What is Saram of Samjae? In the principle of Taekwondo the way of Saram refers to keeping always yourself as what you are, thus, not losing what you intend to do.(Ch.12) To say differently, it is to pursue what you desire to do constantly.

In Cheon Bu Kyeong it was said The one Heaven has a figure, the one Earth has two shapes, and the one Man has three features,1) so the way of Saram can be expressed in three ways. Not to lose what you are as you are; this is the way of Saram presented from the respect of Haneul. This says the transdistinctive essence of the way of Saram. To return to your own central pose; this is the way of Saram presented from the respect of Tang. This says the distinctive essence of the way of Saram. Not to lose what you intend to do; this is the way of Saram presented from the respect of Saram. This says its spiritual inside. It has been said; "While no shape I have inherently I come to have it owing to changes, and while not two things my body is it becomes three owing to its use,"2)and this saying suggests same meaning of that the way of Saram can be presented three ways.

[Haneul of Saram] Not losing what you are you don't lose what you intend to do. For every subjective is grounded on his own will. If a will, which is a willingness, doesn't lose what it is it must preserve what it intends to do. And then, it come to return to the most appropriate motion for its aim, which is because Reversion is the action of <Do>.3)Therefore, everything come to get its own proper position. Thus, it becomes the Haneul in Saram, not to lose what you are.

Let me take an example. A plant begins as a seed and makes its roots and leaves, blooming a flower, then ends up as a fruit, which contains many seeds again. All of these changes are due to that all of them, i.e. a seed, a big tree and everything else, are nothing but a kind of plant breathing together with the whole nature from the deep root and many leaves. Otherwise, a seed would spoil to be a mere piece and a big tree would be nothing more than a lump of wood. They would stop changes of a life, growing no more./ Through all of these temporal processes the core is its "being a plant", and in space the core is the earth where it roots.(Ch.12)

<Man's center is what he intends to do, which is also the life: Nong Ak, a Korean traditional folk dancing>

Likewise, the identity of a man, which is what he is, is to be determined by both what he intends to do and the conditions that regulate his intention and his capacity of doing it from both inside and outside of his intending. Its center is verily what he intends to do, which is also the Life. Therefore Lao Tzu said, too: He who does not lose his place (with Do) will endure. He who dies but does not really perish enjoys long life.4)

[Tang of Saram] Return to your own central pose in every change. It is to collect yourself on your central pose. This is verily the huddling, which is the condition of Kang-gi(technique). In order to follow continuously what the opponent intends to do you should be ready all the way for that following. Therefore you must flow from the prepared pose along what he intends to do, back to your prepared pose again. This is the essence of Yu-gi(technique). The couple of Kang-gi and Yu-gi is the entirety of Taekwondo technique, which enables us to distinguish Taekwondo as what it is that is not another. Therefore, it is Tang in Saram to return to your own central pose.

[Saram of Saram] You shouldn't lose what you intend to do. This is the very natural figure of man who has his life. At the same time. it can be said to be most essential. Therefore, it is the Saram in Saram again.


<footnotes>

1) "ݬ": ߲. Its direct translation is like: "The one Heaven is one, the one Earth is two, and the one Man is three."
2) Ѿ 5. [߲]: , , , ߲.
3) Lao Tsu, Tao Te Ching, 40., Գ.
4) Lao Tsu, Tao Te Ching, 33. , .

 

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